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Epidemiology


Administrative Unit:Population Health Sciences
College/School: School of Medicine and Public Health
Admitting Plans:M.S., Ph.D.
Degrees Offered:M.S., Ph.D.

Faculty:

Faculty: Professors Nieto (chair), Cruickshanks, Durkin, Kanarek, Palta, Patz, Remington, Young; Associate Professors Astor, Bautista, Engleman, Gangnon, Martinez-Donate, Peppard, Sethi, Trentham-Dietz; Assistant Professor Malecki; CHS Professor Brokopp

Overview

Epidemiology is the scientific discipline primarily concerned with identifying the distribution and causes of disease in populations. It encompasses a rich methodology including observational and experimental study designs, statistical methods, an understanding of pathogens, environmental and behavioral risk factors, and human biology. Epidemiological methods have evolved to meet threats of global infectious diseases and the complex health challenges presented by an aging population, as well as to capitalize on the expanding understanding of human genetics. As the fundamental discipline of public health, epidemiology provides essential knowledge to design, implement, and assess approaches to effectively prevent disease and improve quality of life in the population. 

The research-oriented degree programs are designed to provide rigorous training to develop students' abilities to synthesize knowledge and skills needed to address today's health-related problems. Faculty, staff, and students in the Department of Population Health Sciences engage in a wide variety of epidemiological and health services world-class research projects. The interdisciplinary focus allows students the flexibility to work with a wide array of research/faculty on campus.

The department offers two graduate degree programs: an M.S. and a Ph.D. in epidemiology and an M.S. and Ph.D. in population health. While the program is based on a sequence of core courses, students, in consultation with their major professor, have some flexibility to design advanced study and research that best prepares them for their chosen area of interest.

Admission

Applications are welcome from students with diverse academic backgrounds. Students with strong quantitative skills and academic preparation in the biological sciences are strongly encouraged to apply.

Minimum requirements are:

  • Applicants must have an undergraduate degree with a grade point average of 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale), although successful applicants generally have GPAs above 3.0.
  • GRE scores are required for admission. The scores must be no more than five years old at the time of application. For applicants who have completed a doctoral degree, GRE scores are preferred but the program will accept scores for the entrance exam required for the doctoral degree (e.g., MCAT, LSAT). Students should contact the graduate program coordinator to find out if their scores are competitive.
  • Applicants whose native language or language of study is not English must submit official TOEFL scores. Scores must be no more than five years old at the start of the semester for which an applicant is applying. Further details are available on the Graduate School website. Note that the minimum test scores for the program are higher than those required by the Graduate School. For the Test of English as a Foreign Language, TOEFL, minimum scores of 580 (written), 237 (computer-based), or 92 (Internet-based) or above are required.
  • Transcripts must show evidence of quantitative preparation, including at least one semester of calculus as well as a two-semester courses in college-level biology. A personal statement and three letters of recommendation are required. Applicants must meet both the above departmental admission requirements and the Graduate School admission requirements.
  • Upon entry to the graduate program, students are matched with a faculty advisor. Faculty advisors helps students hone their interests, assists with identifying research projects, provide support for career development, and link students to the greater campus community. Students have the benefit of regular dialogues with faculty members. Seminars and integrated discussion groups allow for increased interaction with core faculty and community lecturers. Finally, the work of students is valued as evidenced by their entries in the annual department poster session, participation in public health symposia, authorship of publications, and involvement in community/research projects.

Financial Aid

Students admitted to our degree programs are automatically considered for any available scholarships, traineeships, or graduate assistant positions in the department. The most common forms of funding support for our students are assistantships, traineeships, and fellowships.

For more information: Population Health Graduate Program, 740 WARF Building, 610 North Walnut Street, Madison, WI 53726; 608-263-6583; fax 608-263-2820; pophealth@mailplus.wisc.edu; www.pophealth.wisc.edu.