University of Wisconsin–Madison

Design thinking, time management, and mental wellbeing among Welcome Week topics

The Graduate School is gearing up for the next academic year, but not without a proper welcome for new and returning students alike. Welcome Week kicks off Monday, August 27 with a keynote speech by School of Human Ecology Dean Soyeon Shim. Dean Shim will share her unique perspective on designing one’s life for success, followed by a reception and refreshments. Check out this year’s Welcome Week highlights!

Bob Dylan’s electric guitar and leather jacket inspire a dissertation

Rivka Maizlish studies folk music, folklore, folk art, folk medicine – but she is not a folklorist. Maizlish is an intellectual historian, about to embark on a fellowship with the Smithsonian Institution to dive more deeply into the question, how did people in 20th century America define folk?

“I got interested in that from a number of angles,” said Maizlish, a PhD student at UW–Madison, “but the main thing is I just really love Bob Dylan.”

Looking for links between language and action

Say you’re given a list of six random words. You hear them once, and after a short delay, you have to repeat as many as you can remember.

Your recall ability is based on what’s known as your working memory span. But it’s limited by constraints that vary from person to person and may be based on an individual’s experience with language.

Applying machine learning models to improve dairy farm management

As new technologies have opened doors for dairy farms to harness more data from their herds than ever before, farmers around the state have embraced these innovations.

That leaves farmers with vast amounts of data – on cows, herds, farms, the market, crops, and soils – but, as of yet, no way to integrate the entirety of that data into farm management.

Exploring an antiviral factor that helps, rather than hinders, influenza

Mitch Ledwith is motivated every day by the excitement that comes with new, and sometimes unexpected, discoveries.

As a PhD student in Cellular and Molecular Biology and a research assistant in the Mehle lab, Ledwith has been a firsthand witness to just one of those exciting discoveries on the University of Wisconsin–Madison campus, through a project funded by a UW2020 grant.

Luke Loken

Luke Loken is a hydrologic research technician for the USGS Wisconsin Water Science Center and concurrently pursuing a PhD in Freshwater and Marine Sciences in Emily Stanley’s lab at the Center for Limnology. He and his colleagues at the University of Wisconsin developed a new tool to better understand aquatic ecosystems.