University of Wisconsin–Madison

Edward A. Bouchet Graduate Honor Society

The 2018 Class of Bouchet Society inductees with members of the 2017 class of inductees

The Edward Alexander Bouchet Graduate Honor Society commemorates the first African American to earn a doctorate degree from an American university (Physics, Yale University, 1876). The Bouchet Society seeks to develop a network of scholars who exemplify academic and personal excellence, foster environments of support, and serve as examples of scholarship, leadership, character, service, and advocacy for students who have been traditionally underrepresented in the academy—exemplifying the spirit and example of Dr. Bouchet.

One national charter with two chapters was inaugurated by Yale University and Howard University on September 15, 2005, in commemoration of Dr. Bouchet’s birthday. The University of Wisconsin–Madison Graduate School formed a chapter in 2010. Each year, the Graduate School sponsors a limited number of graduate students and postdoctoral researchers to become members of the national Bouchet Society. Meet our previous UW–Madison inductees in the biographies at the bottom of the page.

Mission Statement

The purpose of the Edward A. Bouchet Graduate Honor Society is to recognize outstanding scholarly achievement and promote diversity and excellence in doctoral education and the professoriate. The Edward A. Bouchet Graduate Honor Society seeks to develop a network of preeminent scholars who exemplify academic and personal excellence, foster environments of support, and serve as examples of scholarship, leadership, character, service, and advocacy for students who have been traditionally underrepresented in the academy. In the spirit of Edward Alexander Bouchet and the scholarship, character, leadership, service and advocacy he exhibited both inside and outside academic realms, inductees into the honor society bearing his name must also exhibit these same outstanding qualities.

Five Qualities of Bouchet Society Members

  • Scholarship

    The Bouchet Graduate Honor Society is a learned society that is committed to the goals of lifelong education, as well as the production and the dissemination of knowledge in the humanities, social sciences and sciences. Members are scholars who are committed to contributing to the development of their field(s) of study and who seek to ensure excellence and innovation in these fields.

  • Character

    Bouchet Graduate Honor Society members must exhibit the highest values of their university, through their integrity, honor, and exemplary conduct and behavior. Character may be exemplified through an individual’s emotional courage, principles, endurance, and the ability to follow through long after the excitement of the task is over. He or she must be reliable and consistent. At each member’s core must be an awareness of the importance of contributing to society and working for the good of society.

  • Leadership

    The Bouchet Graduate Honor Society is comprised of scholars who take personally their responsibility for their departments and their academic fields on local, national, and international levels, as necessary. Bouchet Graduate Honor Society leaders are the embodiment of the ideals of their respective universities. They not only represent the mission of their university but they must also demonstrate strong initiative.

  • Service

    Each member should actively contribute to the well-being of society by giving, remaining involved in the community, sharing of personal gifts and talents, and exhibiting a Bouchet-like commitment to the service of others.

  • Advocacy

    Each member should actively support and advocate for broader access to graduate education and other resources within the academy. Activities might include advocating for the concerns of diverse faculty members and students, serving as a mentor, helping to address the needs of communities, and educating others on the issues that may be at the heart of the continued inequities and disparities in our society, particularly in education.

Nomination Details

All PhD students who reach dissertator status by Spring 2018 and postdoctoral researchers will be eligible to nominate themselves for consideration as 2018 inductees as long as they exemplify the five Bouchet qualities. These self-nominations must include the following:

  • Short Statements (6, limit of 250 words each)—indicate (1) how you embody each of the five Bouchet qualities and (2) how membership in the Bouchet Graduate Honor Society will benefit your academic/professional goals
  • Current Resume/CV
  • One letter of recommendation from each of the following people:
    1. The nominee’s faculty research advisor at UW–Madison.
    2. A leader, on campus or elsewhere, with knowledge of the nominee’s leadership, character, service, or advocacy qualities.
  • 250–500 word abstract (including purpose and background, methods, results, conclusions), single-spaced, 11- or 12-point font. All submissions must be accompanied by the Submissions Cover Sheet. For graduate students, the Submission Abstract form must be signed off by a faculty advisor who has reviewed the abstract, and it must include the title of the project, author name(s) and institutional affiliations. The Graduate School will use this abstract to submit your proposal to present at the Annual Yale Bouchet Conference on Diversity and Graduate Education.
  • A 250-word biographical sketch, emphasizing your research and publications.

Timeline

  • October 1, 2018: Self-nomination application available online
  • January 28, 2019: Deadline to submit nomination materials
  • February 2019: Announcement of UW–Madison new members
  • April 2, 2019: UW–Madison Induction Ceremony
  • April 2019: Bouchet National Induction Ceremony and Annual Conference

Inductees are expected to attend the UW–Madison Induction Ceremony and present at the Annual Bouchet Conference (travel will be covered by the Graduate School).

Bouchet Scholars

Alyssa Marie Ramírez Stege

Alyssa RamirezAlyssa Marie Ramírez Stege is a PhD candidate in the Counseling Psychology program. Her research focuses on the cultural factors that influence psychological training and practice. Alyssa grew up in a low-income household in Mexico where healing practices often reflected her folk beliefs and limited access to resources. For medical care, they sought healing with local practitioners such as hueseros (traditional bone healers), and used their ties to spirituality to cope with a myriad of concerns such as alcoholism, family disruption, and even financial concerns. Alyssa’s view of healing from a young age was integrative as it accounted for restoration of mind, body, and spirit within the context of interpersonal relationships and roles. She did her undergraduate studies in Mexico where often Western psychological theories were taught and applied to a population that was very different to the ones in which the theories had developed.

Her graduate studies in the U.S. have encouraged her to continue to reflect on the meaning of being a healer within and across cultural contexts. Alyssa’s research has focused on how to increase cultural competence, apply culturally congruent psychological interventions, understand culturally diverse perspectives on what constitutes mental health and healing, and recognize the broader role as psychologists in advocating for the clients and systems they work with. The goal of her research has been to increase access to psychological care for groups that are most marginalized, and challenge assumptions within the field to help increase access to care that is congruent to the beliefs and values of diverse groups.

Lorraine Rodriguez-Bonilla

Lorraine Rodriguez-BonillaLorraine Rodriguez-Bonilla is a PhD candidate in the Plant Breeding and Plant Genetics program. Originally from Puerto Rico, Lorraine obtained her bachelor’s in industrial microbiology and a master’s in biology from the University of Puerto Rico, Mayaguez. Currently, she works in the Cranberry Genetics and Genomics laboratory assessing the genetic diversity of wild populations of cranberry in their native range. This work is aimed to provide recommendations to the USDA for the establishment of conservation areas containing plants with unique traits.

Her passion for conservation is only rivaled by her dedication to increasing diversity in the sciences. Lorraine served as the chair of CULTIVAR, a USDA and Texas A&M initiative aimed to increase the number of Latinos in agricultural-related graduate degrees by providing mentoring and professional development tools to aid in their careers. In addition, she has served on the SciMed Peer Mentoring committee for three years; guiding incoming first-year underrepresented graduate students into graduate school. Most recently, Lorraine participated in an internship with the USDA National Institutes for Food and Agriculture (NIFA) in Washington, DC where she wrote articles that highlight the impact of research developed by grantees funded by the agency. In addition, she was involved in identifying novel funding priority areas and the Food Safety Education and Extension Materials website. In the future, Lorraine wants to pursue a career in conservation of agricultural resources where she can work with both researchers and farmers and continue to empower underrepresented students to pursue higher education.

Sarah Stefanos

Sarah StefanosSarah Stefanos is a joint PhD candidate in Sociology and the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her dissertation explores land deals in Ethiopia and biofuels in Uganda. Sarah’s research interests include political economy, natural resource management, the global South, waste, and state/business interactions in the development of inclusive and sustainable cities and towns.

Sarah is co-author of two publications and has presented her research at international conferences of the American Sociological Association, American Anthropological Association, the Rural Sociological Society, and the Society for the Social Studies of Science. She won the 2017 A.C. Jordan Prize from the UW-Madison African Studies Department for the best graduate student paper, the UW-Madison Grand Prize in Globally Engaged Scholarship, and has been a NSF-IGERT, Fulbright-Hays Doctoral Dissertation Research Abroad, Advanced Opportunity, and Borlaug Global Food Security Fellow. Stefanos is deeply committed to helping underrepresented students succeed. She has mentored eight undergraduates, half at UW-Madison and half at Makerere University in Uganda, as well as a Master’s student and high school student. She has also served as the graduate student representative for the Diversity and Equity Committee for the Nelson Institute. She loves teaching and is pursuing a Delta Certificate in Research, Teaching and Learning. In parallel to her academic interests, Sarah co-founded and has served as CFO of W2E Ltd, a waste-to-energy research company in Uganda that specializes in biogas systems and technological/business innovations at the intersection of energy and agriculture.

Diamond Howell

Diamond HowellDiamond Howell is a doctoral candidate at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She is pursuing her PhD in Curriculum & Instruction with a concentration in Multicultural Education. Diamond earned her BA in human development from Connecticut College where she also participated in elementary education and policy in community action certificate programs. Her research interests include social justice education, school/institutional climate, educational access for marginalized students, and identity development within schools. Diamond is a recipient of an Advanced Opportunity Fellowship from the School of Education. Her dissertation research examines experiences of students of color and international students at elite boarding schools in the United States. Specifically, she examines how students’ identities influence their interaction with school settings, and raises important questions about what dreams, desires, aspirations, and sacrifices these institutions represent for students.

During her time in Madison, Diamond has served as a support for graduate students in her roles as a Resident Manager for University Housing and an assistant teacher at Eagle’s Wing Childcare Program. She also volunteers for Freedom Inc. of Dance County. Diamond loves to teach and has experience with students that range from infants to adults. After completing her PhD program, Diamond’s goal is to become a tenured professor where she can continue to teach and conduct research. In doing so, she is committed to encouraging students to examine educational disparities, create research opportunities, and be a mentor for graduate students and undergraduate students, specifically students of color, on their journeys to complete their studies.

Karla B. Hall

Karla HallKarla B. Hall is a Graduate Engineering Research Scholars (GERS) fellow and PhD candidate in Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. She conducts interdisciplinary research with Dr. Gerald Kulcinski in the Nuclear Engineering department, exploring the effects of energetic helium ions on tungsten with the aim of finding a crystal orientation that is less susceptible to radiation damage for fusion reactor divertors and first walls, such as ITER. Hall earned her bachelor’s degrees in Physics and Chemistry from Tennessee State University (TSU). While at TSU, Hall had her first engagement with public education, running a summer camp teaching the next generation about nuclear energy. Before coming to UW-Madison, she worked as a research scientist at TSU in collaboration with the United States Geological Survey mapping the radon gas levels in the greater Nashville, Tennessee area and educated the public about air quality.

She continues to pursue her passion of educating others at UW-Madison and is involved with several outreach activities geared towards STEM. Hall helped establish the Black Graduate and Professional Student Association on campus, which supports and provides a community for Black students. Through her fellowship (GERS), Hall interacts with underrepresented and underserved elementary and middle school-aged children teaching science concepts in a hands-on way. She has won several grants from the university and community partners to support her science outreach, student mentorship, and to recognize women in STEM. Hall has dedicated her career to discovering new advancements in science and inspiring a love for learning in all students.

Albert Bulgerss-HullAlbert Burgess-Hull

Albert Burgess-Hull was an Advanced Opportunity Fellow at the University of Wisconsin–Madison and achieved a PhD from the School of Human Ecology. Albert studied how an individual’s social network influences substance-use behaviors. In addition, he is interested in the use of advanced quantitative methods to inform behavioral research. In this area, he is particularly interested in classification methods such as finite mixture modeling as a way to uncover individual heterogeneity in a population.

Rastafa Geddes

Rastafa GeddesDr. Rastafa I. Geddes was born in St. Thomas, Jamaica and raised in New York City. Dr. Geddes, or Ras, is a product of several socially-driven educational programs aimed at reaching an underrepresented portion of the population (i.e., poor young black males). Armed with a passion for his discipline and a determination to improve “how we educate our biomedical professionals and the masses”, Dr. Geddes has dedicated his career not only to researching therapies for neurological diseases, but to providing similar opportunities that were afforded to him as an impoverished youth. Dr. Geddes is an underrepresented minority in the biomedical field, and as such continues to be in communication with, and hopes to provide ample opportunity to, youths with a similar backstory that are interested in learning more about biomedical research, more specifically TBI and aging-related neurological disorders.

Natalie Guerrero CofieNatalie Guerrero Cofie

Natalie Guerrero Cofie achieved a PhD in Population Health Sciences from UW–Madison. Her research interests include racial/ethnic health disparities in maternal and child health, as well as poverty and immigrant health. Natalie has been the lead author of manuscripts in these research areas, publishing her work in multiple peer-reviewed journals, including the Wisconsin Medical Journal and Preventing Chronic Disease. She has presented her research at national conferences of the American Physician Scientist Association and the American Public Health Association. In her dissertation, she examined the relationship between maternal depression and child problem behavior.

Evelyn HammondEvelyn Hammond

Evelyn Hammond achieved a PhD at the Nelson Institute for Environmental Studies. Her dissertation explores public perceptions of frac sand mining in western Wisconsin. Preliminary results of her research were presented at the International Symposium on Society and Resource Management last summer. Hammond’s research findings will not only inform state and national policy on frac sand mining, but will also worldwide policy on mineral and non-mineral resource management. In April 2016, she was inducted into the UW–Madison Teaching Academy as a Future Faculty Partner.

Nadia KhanNadia Khan

Nadia Khan achieved a PhD in the Cellular and Molecular Biology graduate program at UW–Madison. She was a member of Dr. Avtar Roopra’s lab where she focused on how gene expression in the brain can become reprogrammed after events like traumatic brain injury, which can lead to epilepsy long-term. She currently holds three publications with Dr. Stephen J. Gray in the journals Gene Therapy and Discovery Medicine. She was an active member of the SciMed GRS Peer Mentoring Committee where she helps first-year underrepresented students navigate the first year of graduate school.

Alexandra MacMillan Uribe

Alexandra MacMillan Uribe achieved a PhD in the interdisciplinary graduate program in Nutritional Sciences at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Her experience interning for the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children and her commitment to resolving health disparities inspired her to shift her research focus to maternal and infant nutrition among low-income populations. She worked for Dr. Beth Olson and investigated how to increase the effectiveness of maternal and infant nutrition education to positively affect behavior change. Within this focus, she investigates the mother-infant dyad relationship and how the food environment, created and controlled by the mother, influences maternal and infant nutrition and health outcomes.

Catasha DavisCatasha Davis

Catasha holds an MA in Journalism and Mass Communication and Afro-American Studies. Her research interests are in the areas of media effects, race, health communication, health disparities and social marketing. Catasha uses her background in critical/cultural studies to inform quantitative research on the relationship between race, stereotypes and health disparities. Her dissertation research examines the way media can be used to mitigate health disparities associated with stigma experienced by Black gay men. Throughout graduate school, Catasha has worked in service to the Madison community and her department.

Charee PetersCharee Peters

Charee Peters achieved a PhD in astronomy at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Her research focuses on energetic phenomena in the universe that change in brightness over time, known as transient and variable events. Charee’s thesis work includes answering questions concerning the variability of transient events in radio wavelengths using a new survey called CHILES. As a Yankton Sioux tribal member, Charee was brought up to be proud of her heritage. She strives to create and support inclusive environments for underrepresented people in the fields of physics and astronomy.

Jalissa WynderJalissa Wynder

Jalissa Wynder is a doctoral candidate in the Molecular and Environmental Toxicology (METC) graduate program. Her research focuses on the role of environmental estrogens in prostate disease. She is a member of Dr. William Ricke’s laboratory where she investigates the role of environmental estrogens in benign prostate hyperplasia. While at UW–Madison Jalissa has been involved in the METC’s student led committee (SLC) where she serves as Personal and Professional Development Officer and she participates in the Science and Medicine Graduate Research Scholars program for underrepresented graduate students.

Maichou LorMaichou Lor

Maichou Lor is a PhD candidate in the School of Nursing at University of Wisconsin–Madison. She has distinguished herself as one of a very small group in the Early Entry PhD program. Her research focuses on reducing health disparities of non-English (NES) speaking older adults. Specifically, Maichou’s work focuses on the development and implementation of innovative, culturally and linguistically appropriate care practices aimed at improving quality of care and quality of life for NES immigrant older adults, beginning with Hmong older adults. Maichou is a co-founder of the Multicultural Student Nursing Organization, dedicated to improving the experiences of students and care of culturally diverse populations across care settings at the University of Wisconsin–Madison School of Nursing.

Sarah FrancoSarah Franco

Sarah Franco achieved a PhD from the Cellular and Molecular Pathology (CMP) program at UW–Madison. Her research examines the molecular mechanisms of vascular disease with the goal of identifying new therapeutic targets to prevent restenosis. As a first-generation college student and Hispanic scientist, Sarah was dedicated to improving the inclusion of underrepresented students in science. She served as the graduate co-president of the SACNAS UW–Madison Chapter, whose goal is to help foster opportunities in STEM for underrepresented students.

Yashdeep PhanseYashdeep Phanse

Dr. Yashdeep Phanse is a postdoctoral research associate in the Department of Pathobiological Sciences at UW–Madison. His interdisciplinary research work in immunology and nanobiotechnology in the lab of Dr. Lyric Bartholomay at UW–Madison focuses on novel nanoparticle approaches to design therapeutics for protecting shrimp, a major food source in developing countries, against pathogens. Another area of his research focus is developing next-generation tools to control mosquito-borne diseases through vector control. While pursuing his PhD in the labs of Drs. Michael Wannemuehler, Bryan Bellaire and Balaji Narasimhan, he worked on developing single dose nanovaccines for human and veterinary applications.

Saili KulkarniSaili Kulkarni

Saili Kulkarni achieved a PhD and MS from the Department of Special Education at UW–Madison. Her research examines teacher beliefs and intersections of race and ability. As a special education teacher, Saili helped create the district’s first Inclusive Teacher Network which enabled special education teachers to share resources and build partnerships with universities to increase inclusive opportunities for students with disabilities. For her dissertation, Saili looked at how beliefs about disability, race and culture inform special education teachers’ retention in urban school districts.

Alexandra Law

Alexandra is a doctoral candidate in Cancer Biology at UW–Madison pursuing research on the Human Papillomavirus and HPV-associated cancers. As a member of Dr. Paul Lambert’s lab she is investigating the role of a specific cellular oncogene, EGFR, that has been implicated in causing HPV-associated cancers. While at UW–Madison Alex has been involved in the Science and Medicine Graduate Research Scholars, a community for underrepresented graduate students in the sciences, as well as in the Ford Foundation Fellowships. Alex is Mexican-American and also suffers from moderate-to-severe hearing loss. Alex hopes to continue to advocate for underrepresented and disabled students and encourage them to pursue scientific research careers.

Patrice LeverettPatrice Leverett

Patrice Leverett received an MS in the School Psychology Program in the Department of Educational Psychology. Her dissertation, Redirecting the Pipeline: Behavior interventions and treatment acceptability with African American middle school males, explores the cultural relevance of Positive Behavior Supports (PBS) in school settings. Additionally, Patrice worked at the Center for Women’s Health Research (CWHR) on a National Institutes of Health grant examining the impact of mentoring relationships on the outcomes of underrepresented students in STEM fields.

Gerardo Mancilla

Most of Gerardo’s research has revolved around the area of the “leaky-education pipeline”, which is based on the fact that only 46% of Latinos will graduate from high school. Therefore, his work has focused on what can we do to support Latino students, through a focus on how to build school connectedness for Latino youth at the middle school where he teaches and helping to develop the Latino Youth Summit to encourage Latino middle school students to explore college and careers. In the Madison area, he also serves as the Post-Secondary Chair of the Latino Education Council, Secretary of Nuestro Mundo Incorporated Board, and Secretary of the Vera Court Neighborhood Center Board. He exemplifies the Bouchet qualities by being the first person in his family to earn a bachelor’s degree and hopes to inspire his cousins to believe in themselves so that they will also graduate from college.

Debraj Mukherjee

Dr. Debraj “Raj” Mukherjee received his medical degree from Dartmouth Medical School, where he was named a C. Everett Koop Scholar, Rhodes Scholar finalist, Gold Humanism in Medicine Honor Society member. He served as a health policy fellow under Surgeon General Richard Carmona while at Dartmouth. Dr. Mukherjee is also leading burgeoning efforts in comparative genomics within neurosurgery, with a focus on more personalized and targeted neuro-oncological care.

Kelli Brianna PointerKelli Brianna Pointer

Kelli Pointer achieved a PhD in Cellular and Molecular Biology as well as a doctorate from the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. Kelli joined Dr. John Kuo’s lab at SMPH and her project currently focuses on studying the tumor microenvironment in glioblastoma. She hopes that combining a clinical practice with research will provide her the ability to recognize unanswered questions that arise in clinical medicine and use those questions to develop research aims that are translatable.

Marla Delgado-GuerreroMarla Delgado-Guerrero

Marla achieved a PhD and MS in Counseling Psychology at UW–Madison. Her research examines psychological, social, and cultural factors that influence academic persistence for marginalized communities in higher education. Specifically, she has examined Latina/os in higher education. Her dissertation explores psycho-sociocultural processes within mentoring relationships that influence academic persistence decisions for Latina/o undergraduates. She has been a product of mentoring which has influenced her research.

Utibe Bickham-WrightUtibe Bickham-Wright

Utibe received a PhD in Cellular and Molecular Pathology at UW–Madison. She gained her first research experience in the summer of 2005 at UW–Madison through the Exceptional Research Opportunities Program (EXROP). This and other research experiences that followed solidified her decision to enroll in the Cellular and Molecular Pathology graduate program where she was a dissertator in the laboratory of Dr. Timothy Yoshino. The laboratory investigates several aspects of schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease caused by infection with parasitic worms and is regarded as the second most devastating parasitic disease worldwide, after malaria.

Shannon RobertsShannon Roberts

Shannon received a PhD and MS in the Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering. She believes in supporting and advocating to ensure diversity exists in STEM fields. Shannon served the academic community through activities associated with Graduate Engineering Research Scholars (GRS) program and through the WARF Ambassador Program to promote and encourage underrepresented students to enter the STEM fields.

Michelle RobinsonMichelle Robinson

Michelle received an MS in the Department of Sociology. Her research explores the construction and reproduction of educational inequality. With this research she has explored the impact of data-driven school reform on student achievement, the importance of teacher and parents perceptions of one another for understanding parent engagement and the role of family and school characteristics for unpacking the causal effect of social capital and childrearing.

Patrick BrownPatrick Brown

Patrick Brown, a doctoral candidate in cellular and molecular biology and a medical student. Brown recognizes the need to bridge the research/practice gap. Brown says he was also fortunate to work with Wan-Ju Li on a stem cell and cartilage regeneration project. As an MD/PhD student, Brown has continued to be a part of the Student National Medical Association (SNMA). As the chapter president, he helped organized a voter registration drive and grant writing efforts, helping nine SNMA students at UW–Madison attend the national conference. In addition to his scholarly pursuits, Brown also volunteers as a pianist for the Madison Allied Community Gospel Choir.

Sharee LightSharee Light

Sharee Light received a PhD and MS in psychology studying the neural correlates of mental health states such as creativity and empathy. She is also interested in investigating how these systems operate in individuals who have a mental disorder, such as Major Depressive Disorder (MDD). In addition to her research, Light led courses for disadvantaged high school youth and has served as a teaching assistant for personality psychology. Alongside her clinical neuropsychology supervisor, Carey Gleason, she provided free dementia screenings at community centers such as the Warner Park Community Recreation Center in Madison.

Greg MosbyGregory Mosby

Gregory Mosby received a PhD and MS studying astronomy. He studied galaxies in which some of the most massive black holes reside. He is an award-winning presenter at the American Astronomical Society and National Society of Black Physicists conferences and has a zeal for learning and knowledge dissemination. Mosby served as a graduate student faculty liaison, often bringing together diverse opinions in his department. Beyond campus, Mosby was involved in hosting solar system viewing sessions at state parks around Wisconsin.

Chidi ObasiChidi Obasi

Chidi Obasi achieved a PhD in clinical investigation and an MS in population health in his clinical investigation studying the severity of acute respiratory illness. He was born in Madison, and then completed his medical education in Nigeria. During his time in Nigeria, he evaluated prescription patterns of antimalarial drugs among doctors in a teaching hospital. Obasi served as a reviewer for articles in the Wisconsin Medical Journal and worked as a TRICARE representative, ensuring that military personnel and their families understood and obtained appropriate healthcare.

Myeshia PriceMyeshia Price

Myeshia Price achieved a PhD and MS in psychology studying sexuality. As a former McNair Program scholar, Price was first introduced to research eight years ago, and published two peer-reviewed articles with her academic advisor, Janet Hyde. Through her work as a sexual health scholar at the Center of Excellence for Sexual Health’s community leadership program, Price gained community leadership skills that carried her forward in her research and educational goals. Among her peers and colleagues, she is known as “Switzerland” for her neutrality and objectivity.

Edward ColeEdward G. Cole

Edward G. Cole achieved a PhD and MS in mechanical engineering. In the advanced manufacturing lab of professor Frank E. Pfefferkorn, Cole’s research within friction stir welding (FSW) has examined welding forces influenced by tool design features and the thermo-mechanical responses of various aluminum alloys. Beyond alloy specific measurements and tool design, Cole also has contributed experimental results to funded research objectives for both the U.S. Navy and an industrial research partner in Wisconsin.

Abiola KellerAbiola O. Keller

Abiola O. Keller holds a master of public health from UW–Madison, a master of physician assistant studies from the University of Iowa, and received a PhD in the Population Health Sciences program. Her graduate research with Whitney Witt focuses on better understanding the social, behavioral, and psychological factors that contribute to disparities in health and mental health outcomes across the life span. Her dissertation examines the impact of patient-provider communication on the receipt of adequate treatment for depression among women in the United States and to what extent patient-provider communication impacts disparities in quality treatment. Keller has received several awards including an Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) T-32 Pre-doctoral National Research Service Award (NRSA) Traineeship.

Doug KielDoug Kiel

Doug Kiel studies American Indian history, federal Indian law and policy, and the history of the American West. He is an enrolled member of the Oneida Nation of Wisconsin and recieved a PhD and MA in history from UW–Madison. His dissertation, “Routes of Resurgence: The Wisconsin Oneidas and the Long Red Power Movement,” examines 50 years of tribal revitalization efforts in the United States prior to the advent of casino gaming and traces the extraordinary renascence of the Oneida Nation following the devastating federal policies of the nineteenth century. While the 1920s represented a historic low point for the Oneidas characterized by insufficient access to healthcare, education, and employment, by the 1990s the Oneidas not only had achieved cultural and economic security, they had also become one of the largest employers in northeast Wisconsin.

2011 Bouchet Inductees
(from left): Assistant Dean Dorothy Sanchez, Dyani Reynolds-White Hawk, Gilbert Jose, Crystal Moten, Mike Dockry, Kim Turner, Interim Associate Dean for Graduate Education Sharon Dunwoody

Michael J. Dockry

Mike Dockry is a member of the Citizen Potawatomi Nation and was born and raised in Green Bay, Wisconsin. Since 2005 he has been the USDA Forest Service’s Liaison to the College of Menominee where he facilitates sustainable forestry research, education, and technical assistance of interest to tribal communities. Mike received a PhD in the Forest & Wildlife Ecology Department at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. His research interests include understanding social aspects of forest management, sustainability, indigenous community forestry, and environmental history. Mike’s dissertation explores how an indigenous community in lowland Bolivia and the Menominee Tribe of Wisconsin have used forestry to control their territories, maintain their forests, and sustain their cultures.

Crystal Marie Moten

Crystal Marie Moten achieved a PhD in the Department of History at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. She was enrolled in the Program in Gender and Women’s History and her area of specialization is 20th Century African-American Women’s History. Her dissertation, “Unfinished Business”: African-American Business Women and the Civil Rights Movement in Milwaukee, WI 1940s–1970s, explores the impact of African-American businesswomen on struggles for social justice in the urban north, using Milwaukee, Wisconsin as a case study. Her dissertation argues that these female organizers sought to change the lives of African-Americans in Milwaukee through community development and empowerment. The institutions they created still serve the needs of African-American Milwaukeeans today as the struggle for justice and equality for African-American Milwaukeeans is still “unfinished business.”

Gilbert G. Jose

Gil Jose is a Filipino American, Baltimore native and a brother of Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity Inc. He achieved his PhD in Microbiology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. His dissertation research revolves around determining how a novel antiviral peptide restricts the entry of Herpes Simplex Virus Type I (HSV-1) into host cells. Studying how antiviral peptides function could unlock novel therapeutics for human viral pathogens as well as inform our knowledge of how a virus enters a cell and causes disease. Gil is also interested in working in the field of science policy, specifically around the intersection of science and politics as well as improving the quality of science education and the public understanding of science.

Kimberly J. Turner

Kimberly Turner achieved a PhD and MS in the Department of Sociology at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Her primary research interests lie at the intersection of work and family, particularly for disadvantaged men. Kimberly’s dissertation investigates the link between men’s labor market and family experiences, stressing employment-related characteristics and resources that influence fathers’ involvement and fathers’ wellbeing. As a NICHD pre-doctoral trainee at the Center for Demography and Ecology, she has worked with Marcia J. Carlson on the “Trajectories and Consequences of Nonmarital Fathering” project in recent years. She worked on projects that consider the context in which fathers enact their fathering role (resident vs. non-resident fathers) as a mechanism of inequality and whether fathers’ economic and time investments in children operate as complements or supplements across residential contexts.

Dyani Reynolds-White Hawk

Dyani Reynolds-White Hawk achieved an MFA in the Fine Art Program at the University of Wisconsin–Madison. Through her research and artwork she explores the dilemmas, contradictions, and confusion as well as the joys and blessings of a cross-cultural existence. As a woman of Lakota and European ancestry raised among Native American communities within urban American environments her work focuses on the investigation of communal and personal definitions. By utilizing the visual histories of both Western and Lakota arts, she is able to examine their commonalities and disparities, critically evaluating the tendency of mainstream art communities to segregate or overlook culturally based Native arts. Her paintings and mixed media works dissect and patch together elements of traditional Lakota symbolism and motifs with styles and symbols of Western modernism and the urban environment.