Translating raw data into insight

Niko Escanilla was drawn from his background in mathematics to graduate study in artificial intelligence and machine learning because he was looking for a discipline that could be applied in real world and clinical settings. As a graduate student in Computer Sciences, Escanilla had the chance to put those techniques to work as a research assistant on a UW2020-funded project, assessing variables that can predict the risk of breast cancer.

Archiving today’s culture for tomorrow’s researchers, through podcasts

When Samuel Hansen started producing podcasts about mathematics and science, it was possible for a small, independent podcast like Hansen’s to rank in the country’s top 60 most popular shows. Now, the top charts are dominated by network-produced podcasts, a change that has taken place in the last 10 years alone – but not the last the world of podcasting will see.

To preserve podcasts as they are now, and archive the changes within them, a project at UW–Madison is dedicated to making today’s podcasts available well into the future.

Bob Dylan’s electric guitar and leather jacket inspire a dissertation

Rivka Maizlish studies folk music, folklore, folk art, folk medicine – but she is not a folklorist. Maizlish is an intellectual historian, about to embark on a fellowship with the Smithsonian Institution to dive more deeply into the question, how did people in 20th century America define folk?

“I got interested in that from a number of angles,” said Maizlish, a PhD student at UW–Madison, “but the main thing is I just really love Bob Dylan.”

Applying machine learning models to improve dairy farm management

As new technologies have opened doors for dairy farms to harness more data from their herds than ever before, farmers around the state have embraced these innovations.

That leaves farmers with vast amounts of data – on cows, herds, farms, the market, crops, and soils – but, as of yet, no way to integrate the entirety of that data into farm management.

Vacant, but not empty – graduate student explores the use of abandoned properties

Vacant properties are often seen as remnants of the housing crisis or vestiges of industries that are no longer as present as they once were in U.S. cities. But graduate student Elsa Noterman sees more in these vacant properties, including current uses and important histories.

A PhD student in the UW-Madison Geography Department, Noterman was recently awarded a Dissertation Completion Fellowship from the Mellon Foundation and American Council of Learned Society (ACLS) for 2018-19 for her dissertation exploring the conflict that arises over use and ownership of spaces in the urban commons.

Graduate student profile: Graduating PhD student reflects on research, outreach, and looks to future plans

When PhD candidate Michelle Pizzo joined the Pharmaceutical Sciences program, she didn’t know what, exactly, she would be researching. Since then, she has made advancements in the field of pharmaceutical science and discovered a new direction she is excited to pursue.

Joining the Thorne lab in 2012, Pizzo came on board at a time when a new project was developing. Researchers already believed that the perivascular spaces – the tubular spaces around blood vessels – in the brain could take on waste clearance role, but the Thorne lab wanted to see if those routes could also be used to deliver drugs to the brain, Pizzo said.