Study of high-energy particles leads PhD student Alex Wang to Department of Energy national lab

PhD student Alex Wang was named an outstanding graduate student in the Department of Energy Office of Science Graduate Student Research Program. Through the program he will have a chance to aid in the search for evidence of an extremely rare case where two Higgs boson particles appear at the same time, called di-Higgs production.

PhD student-advisor pairs awarded HHMI Gilliam Fellowships for research, inclusion initiatives

Two student-advisor pairs at UW–Madison have received Gilliam Fellowships for Advanced Study from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI). HHMI Gilliam Fellowships have a twofold mission: to support underrepresented PhD students to pursue scientific research and to foster more inclusive academic environments at institutions that are committed to advancing diversity and inclusion in the sciences.

Using ‘living fossils’, graduate student investigates evolution and antibiotic resistance

All gardeners know what it’s like to try and weed a garden. Even when you keep up with it, sometimes you miss a root or a seed, and the weeds grow back.

As it turns out, this experience applies not only to human gardeners but also to a type of ant that farms its own garden of fungus.

PhD candidate Kirsten Gotting studies evolutionary biology and fungus-growing ants as a member of the Currie Lab in the Department of Bacteriology and the Genetics Training Program. The Currie Lab’s collection of leaf-cutter ants, one of many types of fungus-growing ant, offers a window into the relationships between the ants, the fungus, and other pathogens and bacteria.

Cortney Anderson Kramer

PhD candidate, Art History

If you’ve ever driven by a roadside concrete art park – think sculptures, grottos, or even houses – and been intrigued, art history PhD candidate Cortney Anderson Kramer is the person to ask. Kramer studies and writes about this unique art style in the Midwest.

With NASA award, PhD student seeks answers to life’s biggest questions

Lena Vincent started her career as a graduate student with big questions: How did life begin? Does life exist elsewhere in the universe?

“Realizing that you can turn these existential questions that everyone asks themselves into a scientific career was really exciting,” said Vincent, a PhD student in David Baum’s lab at UW–Madison.