Archiving today’s culture for tomorrow’s researchers, through podcasts

When Samuel Hansen started producing podcasts about mathematics and science, it was possible for a small, independent podcast like Hansen’s to rank in the country’s top 60 most popular shows. Now, the top charts are dominated by network-produced podcasts, a change that has taken place in the last 10 years alone – but not the last the world of podcasting will see.

To preserve podcasts as they are now, and archive the changes within them, a project at UW–Madison is dedicated to making today’s podcasts available well into the future.

Taking a hands-on approach to catalyst research

To Keishla Rivera-Dones, chemical engineering is about more than dealing with chemical reactions; it’s about understanding the building blocks of everything.

A PhD student at UW–Madison in the Dumesic and Huber Research Groups, Rivera-Dones works with supported metal catalysts and applies them to promote and improve the efficiency of chemical reactions.

Design thinking, time management, and mental wellbeing among Welcome Week topics

The Graduate School is gearing up for the next academic year, but not without a proper welcome for new and returning students alike. Welcome Week kicks off Monday, August 27 with a keynote speech by School of Human Ecology Dean Soyeon Shim. Dean Shim will share her unique perspective on designing one’s life for success, followed by a reception and refreshments. Check out this year’s Welcome Week highlights!

Bob Dylan’s electric guitar and leather jacket inspire a dissertation

Rivka Maizlish studies folk music, folklore, folk art, folk medicine – but she is not a folklorist. Maizlish is an intellectual historian, about to embark on a fellowship with the Smithsonian Institution to dive more deeply into the question, how did people in 20th century America define folk?

“I got interested in that from a number of angles,” said Maizlish, a PhD student at UW–Madison, “but the main thing is I just really love Bob Dylan.”

Applying machine learning models to improve dairy farm management

As new technologies have opened doors for dairy farms to harness more data from their herds than ever before, farmers around the state have embraced these innovations.

That leaves farmers with vast amounts of data – on cows, herds, farms, the market, crops, and soils – but, as of yet, no way to integrate the entirety of that data into farm management.

Using artificial intelligence for a big impact on neurodevelopmental research

Arezoo Movaghar earned her master’s degree in computer science and artificial intelligence. She built models based on the plentiful data found in medical records. So, when she came to UW–Madison as a PhD student and joined a research group, it surprised Movaghar to find out just how much data researchers in other fields collect.