Graduate student studies how snake fungal disease could spread

While scientists have studied the symptoms and behavior of snakes infected with snake fungal disease, few studies looked at whether the fungal pathogen responsible could spread to other species. That was the central question for Savannah Gentry, a botany PhD student in Anne Pringle’s lab, who wanted to find out whether snake fungal disease could affect other reptiles.

Dairy science research aims to mitigate low calcium levels in cows

Dairy cows usually experience their lowest calcium levels in the first day or two after giving birth. As cows rapidly produce milk to feed the calf, low calcium levels in their bloodstreams can lead to a disease known as milk fever. Researchers at the UW–Madison Department of Dairy Science are exploring methods for regulating cows’ calcium levels in the days after calving, aimed at improving cow health.

Student’s MBA education helps MIA project see patterns among the missing

When service members have gone missing around the globe, and when pieces of information about their life or disappearance are scattered, where do you start to bring someone home?

U.S. Army Captain Christopher Zaczyk, a second-year MBA student at the Wisconsin School of Business, starts with making sense of the information they have, and bringing it to a level where people can interact with it.

The UW Missing in Action Recovery and Identification Project (UW MIA RIP) partners with the federal government to investigate cases of those who have gone missing during service and advance their recovery efforts.

Grad student develops a family tree for corn varieties in North America

When plant breeders develop a new line of crops, plant variety protections allow that breeder to keep the rights to it. Plant varieties, many of which are created by private seed companies, are protected this way for 20 years before their genetic information becomes publicly available. As of May 2019, the genetic information for 460 varieties of corn alone are available this way. “The material is quite elite still,” said graduate student Mike White. “Even though it’s 20 years old it is a large source of elite germplasm for companies to use and improve on.”